What about the Google Phone is Going to matter?

Take a peek on Techmeme and you might think the only story in tech news is the upcoming and likely release of a Google Phone.  I’m sure it will be decent enough but am starting to question the logic a bit given the rumor that the Nexus One as it seems to be called will be sold as an open device, yet on T-Mobile.

I’m definitely a fan of open.  I absolutely prefer that my mobile devices not have restrictions based on operator business development initiatives and instead offer all that the hardware and OS can deliver.  I just don’t see how this device is going to really make that much of a difference for the mainstream consumer – or for T-Mobile.  According to the FCC leak the supported bands will be global and specifically TMO’s (1700) in the US.

If T-Mobile sells and supports the device it will really be a T-Mobile device.  Even if you buy it elsewhere you will need to run it on T-Mobile (again in the US) to actually take advantage of the 3G services and why would you buy an advanced smartphone otherwise?

I would love to be a fly on the way at Verizon Wireless right now.  They just spent gobs of cash launching the Droid which is strongly co-branded Google and has little to no Verizon anywhere.  Maybe they jumped the gun on going for Droid so quickly when big G had this cooking (to compete) all along …

I’m wondering whether Google might be looking to upend the subsidy market by  taking on the cost directly in exchange for all the lovely data they track … assuming a Google phone is like the G1 in that you must have a Google Account for it to work.  I tend to agree with Ewan that this really is going to be a price play.  It’s unlikely that this will be the phone for me, and I do wonder who an open Android device is for just now … Looking forward to seeing how this all plays out.

6 comments for “What about the Google Phone is Going to matter?

  1. 12/14/2009 at 3:16 pm

    Really? i heard it also supports the AT&T bandwidth, is that story false? http://bit.ly/68VncJ

  2. 12/14/2009 at 5:18 pm

    From what I read earlier on Engadget, it was not going to support AT&T 3G bands … guess we'll have to wait and see. http://bit.ly/8Uk4z6

  3. nqlogic
    12/14/2009 at 7:42 pm

    Google is moving down in the stack to challenge B2C opponents with an open architecture and new sets of standards. In creating a post-revenue business model, Google can only manage success if consumers accept a co-branding and outsourced manufactured device … NQ Logic recommends reading about the rest of the new Google's mobile strategy at http://www.nqlogic.com

  4. 12/14/2009 at 8:16 pm

    Really? i heard it also supports the AT&T bandwidth, is that story false? http://bit.ly/68VncJ

  5. 12/14/2009 at 10:18 pm

    From what I read earlier on Engadget, it was not going to support AT&T 3G bands … guess we'll have to wait and see. http://bit.ly/8Uk4z6

  6. nqlogic
    12/15/2009 at 12:42 am

    Google is moving down in the stack to challenge B2C opponents with an open architecture and new sets of standards. In creating a post-revenue business model, Google can only manage success if consumers accept a co-branding and outsourced manufactured device … NQ Logic recommends reading about the rest of the new Google's mobile strategy at http://www.nqlogic.com

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: